Robotic responsibility for machine learning: privacy perspectives in autonomous decisions

Robotic responsibility for machine learning: privacy perspectives in autonomous decisions Apr 26, 2017

Katherine Sheriff, juris doctor; legal scholar, Warshauer Law
Group PC; Emory University School of Law, USA

Katherine Sheriff will be speaking at The Future of Transportation World Conference on July 5-6, 2017 in Cologne, Germany

Traditional tort liability relies on concepts emerging from interactions
between vehicles and humans. In many ways, tort law reflects the
inherent knowledge humans carry in their daily activities and the
limitations of epistemological means of acquiring knowledge, while
valuing privacy. Although these concepts are flexible and readily
ascribable to humans in a wide variety of circumstances, it is unclear
how, and if, these concepts should be applicable to artificial intelligence.
This paper proposes to extend tort law and knowledge via quantitative
dynamic software testing to determine liability for decisions made by
artificial intelligence utilised by programming in autonomous vehicles.

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